2/09/2011

The Episcopal Diocese of Haiti rises from the ruins

3 comments:

  1. Mark: My only question is: Given the amount of time that the Episcopal Church has been educating young people, where are those now-adults in the political structure of Haiti? They appear to be absent, since the government hasn't function well, if at all, for many years.

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  2. Tom... they are everywhere in the structures and businesses, social services and development organizations. Some are quite important to life in Haiti, others are not.

    There is not a direct relation between the education of students and the workings of government, as you know. But my sense is (after some 15 visits to Haiti over 40 years) that many of the graduates of places like College St. Pierre in Port au Prince have been very active in business and government and many have contributed to what functioning there has been.

    Graduates of the College are everwhere - in places we would feel very good about (running the Airport for example) and others we might question (Military officers). They are there. There are many teachers that are educated in Episcopal schools and they may be the group that does the most continuous good.

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  3. I didn't think that they had just vanished, but their influence does not (as yet) seem to be sufficient to affect the chronic poverty and corruptionmin the country. At some point one would hope for a critical mass of educated, moral young people to assume some sort of power that places Haiti on a positive trajectory, but we haven't seen much of that.

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